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Posts Tagged ‘debt reduction’

Bring Out Your Dead!

March 5th, 2010 No comments

We’re not dead. We’re feeling much better! I’ve ignored this blog for about 14 months now, but it’s time to get back on track.  We’ve totally blown our debt reduction goals.  Some in part to unforeseen expenses, but a lot due to over spending.  But we have made progress.  We have a little more than $1,200 in credit card debt left to pay, a couple medical bills, and then we will be debt free save the mortgage, but that should be paid off within 10 years even without any extra going towards it (bi-weekly payments rock.)

So my resolution for March is to post to this blog more.  Which, considering one post in 14 months, shouldn’t be too time consuming!

Don’t Bring Me Down

January 21st, 2009 No comments

Reading back through my posts, the majority of them seem to have a negative slant, but that’s not my intention.  Our plan to get out of debt shouldn’t be depressing, and it isn’t; I get excited when I think about it.  Every time I see how much money we have budgeted (and ready) for something, it gives me a warm fuzzy feeling.  We’re definitely not invincible, but knowing that I have that $1,000 sitting there and ready in case something happens is a wonderful feeling.

The pace of our debt reduction is slower than I want, but there is progress forward.  I hope that at the end of January, when we have our emergency fund resupplied, we should have a couple hundred extra bucks to put towards one of the accounts, and, God willing, we have that $4,000 retired by May.

Another good thing is that our Flex spending account this year will be back to being as functional as it was in previous years.  Before, we had a debit card that you could you not only for prescriptions, but also to handle copayments, glasses, contacts, over the counter drugs, etc.  Last year, when our insurance switched, you could only use the card for prescriptions.  To add insult to injury, any long term prescriptions you had were required to be ordered from the insurance company’s own mail order pharmacy, making the card even less useful (and the mail order place balked at letting you use the debit card issued by the insurance company!)  So the money I had budgeted for the up-front cost of contacts and such can now go towards debt. $18 a paycheck, but it will make a difference.

So my latest goal is to not sound down or negative about our finances all the time.  We’re gonna get there, stumbling blocks or not.